Mangrove forests of Qeshm

By Shirdal Airya Iranian Tour Operator & Travel Agency in Iran

Mangrove forests of Qeshm The Mangrove forests of Qeshm or Hara forests of Qeshm is the common name for mangrove forests on the southern coast of Iran, particularly on and near the island of Qeshm in the Persian Gulf. Dominated by the species Avicennia marina, known locally as the “hara” or “harra” tree, the forests represent an important ecological resource. The “Hara Protected Area” on Quesm and the nearby mainland is a biosphere reserve where commercial use is restricted to fishing (mainly shrimp), tourist boat trips, and limited mangrove cutting for animal feed
Hara tree characteristics
The hara tree, Avicennia marina, grows to heights of three to eight meters and has bright green leaves and twigs. The tree is a salt-water plant that is often submerged at high tide. It usually blossoms and bears fruit from mid-July to August, with yellow flowers and a sweet almond-like fruit. The seeds fall into the water, where wave action takes them to more stationary parts of the sea. The hara seeds become fixed in the soil layers of the sea and grow. The area on the north shore of Qeshm and the neighboring mainland is particularly suited to the growth of the plant, and large mangrove forests have developed.
The long, narrow, oval leaves of the tree have nutritious value for livestock roughly equivalent to barley and alfalfa. The roots of the tree are knee-form, aerial, sponge-like and usually external. There is a filtration property in the hara tree’s bark which allows the plant to absorb sweet water while salt is eliminated

About Shirdal Airya

Today among all destinations, Iran is one of the selected places that it is chosen by many different nations. Therefore, it deserves to see how great the Persia is and our professional team is ready to give you all the best tour and travel services. Naser Pirouzi and Masih Bayramzadeh established the agency in 2012. Both of them had been working as tour guides and tour operators since 2001, Click to continue…